Archive for the ‘Red Wing’ Category

The E. S. Hoyt House in Red Wing

Saturday, February 11th, 2017
300 Hill Street Red Wing E. S. Hoyt House

300 Hill Street, Red Wing

Known as one of Minnesota’s best examples of the Prairie School style, as well as one of the finest designed by its architects, William Purcell and George Elmslie, this modern home for the time was the talk of the town when construction was completed in 1913. Built for Elmore S. Hoyt, then President of the Red Wing Union Stoneware Company, the home was placed on the National Registry of Historic Places in 1975. The house remained in the Hoyt family until 1976, and has only had two other owners in its long history.

300 Hill Street Fireplace mosaic glass tile

Close up of the fireplace glass mosaic

Hoyt was born in Kansas, arriving in Red Wing in 1881 at the age of eighteen years. He began working as a salesman with the Minnesota Stoneware Company and eventually married a local veterinarian’s daughter, Florence McCart, in 1888. In 1893, Hoyt was named general manager of the company. He later helped engineer the merger of the Minnesota Stoneware Company and the Red Wing Union Stoneware Company in the early 1900s, becoming it’s president. The company eventually became Red Wing Pottery, a name that still resonates with collectors and enthusiasts today.

Well positioned on its lot, the Elmore Sherman Hoyt House stands as a testament of the modern movement that still resonates today. Sections of the second floor cantilever over the main floor with many of the brackets featuring fret-sawn ornamental panels of botanical and geometric details designed by Elmslie. The exterior rose-colored stucco was specifically chosen by the architects to pair with the Oriental brick brought in from Brazil, Indiana. A decorative screen, befitting the architectural style, was added in 1915 by the architects to the passageway leading from the house to the garden shed and garage.

Three panel art glass pocket door into living room

One of the standout features of the Hoyt House is the 99 diamond-patterned art glass windows arranged in long bands around the home, and inside too. Designed by Elmslie, who had an artistic specialty for ornamental motifs, the windows consist of pale, opalescent colors and clear glass to allow as much natural sunlight into the home as possible. The living room, dominated by windows, features a massive art glass pocket door, as well as a built-in bench and wood burning fireplace. The decorative mosaic panel above the fireplace, designed by Edward L. Sharretts of Mosaic Arts Shops in Minneapolis, is made of ultramarine, green, and black opal glass and porcelain with antique dull gold leaf fired on, and depicts a moonlit scene with clouds and trees. In the dining room, two grand built-in buffets with art glass flank the entry into the pantry, where the original telephone room has been converted to a half bath. The kitchen is the only room that has had extensive updates over the years, and features a set of cabinets that were originally used in the living room as bookcases.

 

The E. S. Hoyt House has been featured in the following books:

Minnesota’s Own: Preserving Our Grand Homes
At Home on the Prairie: the Houses of Purcell and Elmslie
Historic Homes of Minnesota
A Face of Red Wing

UPDATE: SOLD  It is also currently For Sale. Make sure to view the 3-D interactive home tour!

Round Barn in Red Wing

Sunday, March 2nd, 2014
Historic Round Barn Red Wing

Looking up into the rafters

The historic Round Barn property just outside of Redwing. I wrote a blog post about the property a few years ago when I was allowed to photograph the barn and grounds. The main house is new and currently run as a Bed and Breakfast.

Round Barn Redwing Minnesota

 

First United Methodist Church in Red Wing

Monday, May 30th, 2011

403 East Avenue, Red Wing

The First Methodist Church of Red Wing was founded in 1853 and had a Greek Revival styled church constructed in 1858. One year later the church was damaged by a storm, and a new church was constructed on site in 1860. The Second Methodist Church of Red Wing survived until 1907 when it was destroyed by fire three days before Christmas. It took two years to construct the current structure (the Third Methodist Church now know as the First United Methodist Church) which was dedicated December 1909.

During the 1909 dedication, a times capsule was created by the congregation and placed behind the corner stone cap. One hundred years later, in 2009, the capsule was opened to reveal newspaper clippings, a hymnal, and a bible (just to name a few). The church was rededicated and a new time capsule was created with items chosen by the current congregation.
Learn more about the history of this church, including old photos of the First and Second Methodist buildings, and photos of the time capsule contents at the church website.
The current church was built with local quarried stone and has some beautiful gothic features, as seen in the above photo.

The Theodore Sheldon Mansion in Red Wing

Monday, April 18th, 2011

805 W 4th Street, Red Wing

When driving by this grand historic home in Red Wing, MN, it becomes quite apparent that something just doesn’t seem right. You would be correct to notice that the Italianate looking home has a tower that seems to stand out more than usual for a home of this style. The answer to the mystery is that the third floor is missing.

Built in 1876 for Theodore B Sheldon, the home was designed by St. Paul architect A.M. Radclifff in the French Second Empire style. Born in Massachusetts in 1820, Mr. Sheldon was involved with many business ventures which helped his fortune grow including, mercantile, real estate, grain, transportation, and bank President. He died in 1900.

Home as originally built

Over the years, the home has seen many owners, but has remained in fantastic condition for its age. It is also listed on the National Registry for Historic Places. Sometime around 1960, the owner at the time was unable to finance the repair of the Mansard roof (due to water damage) so he removed the entire third level of the home, forever changing the home from Second Empire to Italianate. While it would cost a great deal to reconstruct the third level, it would be nice to see the exterior of the home returned to its full original splendor.

Picture of the home 1960

Picture of home 1974