Archive for the ‘Greek Revival’ Category

The Schneider Tavern in Frontenac

Saturday, September 16th, 2017
The Schneider Tavern at 28971 Wood Avenue, Frontenac, MN

28971 Wood Avenue, Frontenac

Built in 1862 by Engelbert Haller and Kasper Koch, this lovely Greek Revival building was originally built to operate as a general store and served as the township’s stagecoach stop; however, two years after completion it was sold to Jacob Schneider who used it as a tavern and hotel. The tavern and store were located on the main floor (now the living room and office), with simple accommodations to rent upstairs. A separate entrance on the side of the home was used so guests could access the rented rooms and store without passing through the tavern, and is the reason why the main staircase is located behind the front rooms and not at the front of the home (like residential homes of the era). The Schneider Tavern was in operation until 1887 when it was sold to the son of Evert Westervelt.

Evert Westervelt arrived to the area from Pennsylvania in 1852 and is the founder of the small town of Frontenac, originally named Westervelt. Having opened a local limestone quarry of dolomite shortly after his arrival (which supplied all the local limestone foundations, walls, and tombstones), he purchased a total of 320 acres of land as the site of his new town and began the process of plotting streets and lots to sell to future settlers. In 1859, the town was renamed Frontenac in honor of Louis de Buade de Frontenac, governor general of Canada between 1670-1698. (Minnesota did not become a state until 1858).

The home stayed in the Westervelt family until it was purchased in 1982 by a couple who began the restoration process and opened the home as a bed and breakfast. In 1999, the current owner purchased the home, and over a decade, restored and updated the home further, including the restoration of the front porch. Using old photos, the owner was able to recreate the original design and trim detail.

Photo of the home pre-bay window on the side of the home.

Old photos of historic homes are extremely useful for restoration efforts and determining what architectural elements were original or added in later decades. For instance, the Schneider Tavern, was not originally built with a bay window on the southern side of the home, to the left of the porch. It was added later, sometime after 1891, when Westervelt purchased the home and used it as a private residence (we can surmise that the above photo was taken after 1891 simply because that was the year the American company of Anchor Post and Fence bought the patent rights to the chain link fence from a United Kingdom company and began production in the United States). From what I have read in a book about Frontenac, there is a question on whether the Moorish attic windows were added later, but looking at old photos and the design of the home, it appears they are original to the structure. Other questions have been asked about the decorative gable trim (if it was added by more recent owners), but again, old photos show the gable trim and porch brackets date to at least pre-1887.

Schneider Tavern pre-rear porch enclosure, but after bay window addition

This home is currently “pending” for sale. Additional information, photos, and an interactive 3-D tour can be viewed at the property website.

 

Original limestone horse hitching post that was quarried from Westervelt's local limestone quarry.
Original limestone stagecoach steps that were quarried from Westervelt's local limestone quarry.
An original small horse barn on the property
Up close photo of the Moorish attic windows and decorative gable trim.

Dacotah Cottage in Frontenac

Sunday, February 16th, 2014
28743 Garrard Ave, Frontenac, MN

28743 Garrard Ave, Frontenac, MN

It was in 1859 that Lewis Garrard moved to Frontenac (thus named the same year) and built a small one and a half story house with a few one-story wings coming off the main house. The main entrance faced the lake, had a small porch and balcony, and the property was surrounded by a white fence. He had been here before eight years earlier with his brother Israel, both men looking for land and investment opportunities. While his older brother stayed and became part owner of the town (called Westervelt at the time) with Evert Westervelt, Lewis traveled back home to Cincinnati and then on to Europe.

Original Dacotah Cottage

Original Dacotah Cottage

After his return, Mr. Garrard married in 1862 and decided to expand the home for his new family. The original house was turned into the larger, two-story home we see today, with hipped roof, covered front porch with sleeping porch above, larger double-hung windows, decorative lentils, and shutters. Later, a one story, northern wing that housed his medical office was removed and moved a block south.

Dactoah Cottage in Winter

In 1869, scarlet fever was sweeping through the small river towns. Lewis Garrard’s two young sons were stricken with the illness and later died. Devastated by their loss, the Garrard family moved to Lake City. Amazingly, they did not sell the house, but maintained it for the next 56 years, finally selling the home in 1926. It was purchased by Ted Hall, son of Osee Hall, a long time friend of the Garrard family. How long they owned it, I am not sure, but the home has been with the Hodgson family since 1960.

Locust Lodge in Frontenac

Wednesday, March 6th, 2013
29133 Garrard Ave, Frontenac signed 
29133 Garrard Avenue, Frontenac

Built around 1853, this beautiful example of a Greek Revival  home is quietly tucked away behind a row of trees, and at one time had grand views of the Mississippi River.  The local village was layed out by the original owner Evert Westervelt, comprising of 320 acres purchased from the wives of Jane Wells and Elizabeth Faribault, and properly named Westervelt. In 1859, the town was renamed Frontenac  in honor of Louis de Buade de Frontenac, governor general of Canada between 1670-1698.

Since Mr. Westervelt owned the land, he cut out six large lots of six acres each above the river, and built the first large home of the area in 1853 on the best lot. The first of its kind for the area, the home’s dolomite stone foundation was from the local quarry and most of the mill work was shipped in from out East. The home was named Locust Lodge by the owner for the locust trees on the land.

29133 Garrard Ave, Frontenac

In the photo above you can visualize the details common with Greek Revival – corners of Doric pilasters, decorative frieze with dentils, 6 over 6 window sash, and a gable will full pediment. Around 1900, a one-story addition was added to the rear of the home for a kitchen and bathroom.

My Feature in the Star Tribune

Friday, September 28th, 2012
302 Fremont Avenue, Anoka
302 Fremont Avenue, Anoka
It’s always nice to get a call to speak about the importance of historic home preservation. It rarely happens to be a feature article in a major local newspaper, so you can imagine my surprise when just that happened. The Star Tribune gave me a call about the Shaw-Hammons House in Anoka, pictured above, whose owner informed them of my historic home specialty in real estate. They wanted to know about concerns in preservation and saving endangered properties from demolition, and I was happy to let them know my thoughts on the matter.

This old Anoka house gets new lease on life, but others slip into history

Article by: Paul Levy , Star Tribune

Built in 1852 and owned by Minnesota’s first senator, the historic house in Anoka was in shambles. Junk cluttered the yard. Wiring had been ripped away. Rooms were coated in dust, gutted and vandalized. Even the bathtub was missing.The home was simultaneously listed on the National Register of Historic Places and Minnesota’s Ten Most Endangered Properties list. But today, after a renovation that took three years and more than $100,000, it is the oldest home in Minnesota on the market. Historic-homes experts call it a “miracle.”

With few preservation programs available, it’s also a rarity. Indifference from city officials, minimal grant aid and foreclosures have placed the futures of some of Minnesota’s most prized historic homes in jeopardy.

“It can take more than a century to be placed on the National Register of Historic Places and only a few minutes for that same house to be bulldozed,” said Realtor Jennifer Kirby, creator of the “Historic Homes of Minnesota” blog. 

Read more from the article…

 

Greek Revival Historic Home in Prescott

Friday, April 10th, 2009
606 North Lake Street, Prescott, WI

Today I was traveling through Prescott, Wisconsin to list a home for sale and I came across a great representation of the Greek Revival style. Built in 1854 by Hilton Doe, the home sits just off the St. Croix River, and probably at that time, had an even better view of the river (no houses in front of it). Mr. Doe was apparently a pioneer of the area, with the home remaining in the Doe family until 1867. Around 1895, Julius Knoblach acquired the property and the home was in his family for the next 57 years. In 1994, the home was restored and looks fantastic for its age.

Greek Revival Historic Home on Nicollet Island

Tuesday, October 28th, 2008

This weeks historic home is located at 101 W. Island Avenue on Nicollet Island.

For those of you not familiar with Minneapolis, Nicollet Island is located on very small piece of land in the middle of the Mississippi River, just off downtown. This simple Greek Revival home is known as the R.M.S. Pease House and was originally located at 814 University Avenue. It was moved to its current location in 1986. Rev. Mr. Pease was a well known banker and minister in Minneapolis and Saint Paul in the mid-1800’s.